Posted by & filed under Big Data, Careers, Cloud Computing.

Wiley Blog

Cisco Canada has committed to investing $150 million in Canadian venture-capital funds, incubators and innovative companies as part of its innovation hub strategy that could bring 1,700 new jobs to Ontario.

Source: CBC

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link to article with video: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cisco-to-invest-150m-in-startup-technology-in-canada-1.2680919

Discussion

1) “Canada continues to produce some of the top engineering and management talent in the world and is home to dynamic industries that are ripe for business transformation” says the head of Cisco Canada.  What do you think he means by “ripe for business transformation”?

2) “The company plans direct technology sector investment in areas such as cloud infrastructure, digital media, big data management, intelligent infrastructure and mobility”.  What are you doing to better understand these “transformational” technologies?

Posted by & filed under IT Trends, politics, WI-Fi.

Wiley Blog

Customers at a Toronto Tim Hortons use public Wi-Fi. Some smaller cities in Canada have had more success in providing free public Internet access instead of Toronto, which continues to strive for more Wi-Fi at city parks and facilities as well as in community housing. 

Source: Toronto Star

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link:Free public wifi in Toronto

Discussion

1) “The more tech-friendly a city becomes, the more incentive there is for startups to set up base here,” says the article.  Is free Wi-Fi really a case of being “tech friendly” and would it make a difference to you if you were starting up a company?

2) The article notes that free Wi-Fi will help “combat the digital divide.”  What is the Digital Divide, and how would free Wi-Fi help?

 

Posted by & filed under competitive advanatage, Ecommerce, IT Trends.

Wiley Blog 4

A leading web analytics company says in a new report that traffic from Facebook to some of the top news publishers declined at double-digit rates in the second quarter of this year. SimilarWeb found that Facebook visits to some media companies are down by as much as 50% compared with the first quarter.

Source: Fortune

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link: http://fortune.com/2016/08/16/facebook-traffic-media/

Discussion

1) The article notes that “Facebook said that it was going to de-emphasize articles from mainstream media sites in favor of posts from a user’s friends and family. Any decline in Facebook traffic can have a huge impact on media companies because they rely on that traffic for a large proportion of their advertising revenue.”  Imagine you are responsible for the social media aspect of a company you work for.  What can you do to improve traffic for your company?

2) “BuzzFeed publisher Dao Nguyen pointed out that the SimilarWeb numbers only apply to desktop visits from Facebook, which suggests that some of the decline could be a result of web traffic moving to mobile. About half of the social network’s 1.4 billion users access the site primarily on a mobile device.”  This move-to-mobile is something that most college students are acutely familiar with.  What difference does it make that a person goes to a website on their mobile device versus their desktop computer?

 

Posted by & filed under App Economy, IT Trends.

Wiley Blog 3

Three months after Berkshire Hathaway began investing in Apple, Warren Buffett’s investment company dramatically boosted its stake in the iPhone maker, according to a new government filing.  The world’s most successful investor now owns nearly $1.5 billion worth of the tech giant’s stock.  Yet as recently as 2012 Buffett vowed that he wouldn’t invest in companies like Apple or Google(a.k.a. Alphabet) and that he was uncomfortable betting on fast-growing tech disruptors. “The chances of being wrong with IBM are probably less, at least for us, than the chances of being way wrong in Google or Apple.”  Something has changed.

Source: Fortune

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link: http://fortune.com/2016/08/16/warren-buffett-apple-stock/

Discussion

1) Do you agree, or not, with the comment in the article that “Apple’s business model is not that different from Gillette’s razor-and-blade approach, where purchasing the basic service item (the razor) requires you to buy a constant stream of its companion products (the blades)”?

2) Why does it matter, or not, that the world’s most successful investor is making a big play into Apple?

 

Posted by & filed under Business Intelligence, Civil Liberties, Cybersecurity.

Wiley Blog 2

 

The whistleblower Edward Snowden believes Russia is behind a leak of malware allegedly belonging to the US National Security Agency (NSA).  Hackers calling themselves Shadow Brokers started an auction for the malware last week.  The malware is used by the NSA to attack or counter-attack in cyberspace.

Source: BBC Technology

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37104745

Discussion

1) The article notes that “Mr Snowden said the “hack of an NSA malware staging server is not unprecedented, but the publication of the take is”.  The idea here is that governments routinely try to steal other governments hacking tools so they can better understand how a hack is done and almost more importantly who is doing the hacking.  Why is it so important for a government to know who is doing the hacking?

2) The article notes that “Accordingly, this may be an effort to influence the calculus of decision-makers wondering how sharply to respond to the DNC hacks.”  The DNC mentioned here is the U.S. Democrat National Committee, which is charge of the U.S. Democrat political party.  The DNC was hacked, allegedly by Russia, several weeks ago and emails were leaked to the press resulting in the head of the DNC having to resign.  Edward Snowden is suggesting here that his latest hack of the NSA malware is an attempt to limit any response by the U.S. government to this DNC hack.  As much as this whole thing sounds like the plot of the latest N.Y. Times best selling spy novel, how much should a person responsible for IT and security at a company consider it?

 

Posted by & filed under App Economy, Emerging Technologies, Ethical Issues, Ford.

Wiley Blog

Ford has said it will mass-produce a fully autonomous self-driving car without a steering wheel by 2021.  Ford said it would double its investment in its research center in Palo Alto, California, as well as making sizable investments in technology companies in the autonomy industry.  The firm said the car would be in use by customers by 2021.  It said this was most likely as part of an Uber-like ride-sharing service – but one that doesn’t require a human driver.

Source: BBC Technology News

Date: August 17th, 2016

Link: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37103159

Discussion

1) The article notes that the CEO of Ford described this announcement as “transformational” and signaled an era when Ford sees itself, particularly in cities, as a company that provides an ad-hoc service rather than focusing solely on selling the cars to the general public.  This move to providing on-demand services like Uber and Airbnb is routed in technology and particularly smartphone apps.  What other things that are currently sold could be instead provided as a service?

2) Who is likely to be an early adopter of a driverless car, and why is this important?

Posted by & filed under Android, app, e-payment, Google, Google Play Store, online business, online gaming, smartphones, Social Media, Software.

Description: The final winners will be announced live on May 19th at 7 PM PT at Google I/O and will be live streamed.

Source: Tech Crunch

Date: April 22, 2016

googleplayawards

Apple has historically doled out annual awards to those third-party app developers that it believes have created the best apps and games over the past 12 months. Now, Google is launching its own take on app awards with the debut of what it’s calling the “Google Play Awards.” But while familiar in concept, Google’s version will tweak the formula somewhat from Apple’s version.

While Apple’s annual awards are announced at year-end just ahead of the holidays, in order to present a group that made waves during the past calendar year, Google’s award winners will be announced at the company’s I/O conference in May.

According to Google’s announcement, the program will feature five nominees across 10 categories, and these are now showcased in a special collection on Google Play.

Read More.

Questions for discussion:

1. Are you an Android or an iOS user?

2. Is it possible that these App Awards are just a ploy to advertise and make money from users?

Posted by & filed under app, artificial inteligence, Green Tech, Hardware, innovation, Security, Smart Home, smartphones, Software.

Description: Connected smart home devices are well on their way to becoming as prevalent as smartphones and tablets.

Source: Tech Crunch

Date: April 21, 2016

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A new study conducted by MARU/VCR&C, and commissioned by Telus, found a significant gap between those that believe that smart home technology will benefit their lives (61 per cent) and those who currently own a smart home device (34 per cent).

That’s about to change, however, with 63 per cent of people predicting that they will own at least one smart home device – such as a smart TV, thermostat, lighting, appliance, entry and security system; and other home automation solutions – by 2018, and with half of those predicting they will own three or more.

The greatest perceived benefits of living in a smarter home include saving money and being greener (57 per cent) and increased security or safety (44 per cent). Of those who currently own smart home technology, the most popular devices are smart TVs (65 per cent) and smart thermostats (36 per cent). For those who travel frequently, 56 per cent said they are likely to purchase smart home devices to manage household tasks and provide peace of mind while they are away.

Read More.

Questions for discussion:

1. Do you use any “smart home” apps or services?

2. If it meant saving money in the long run, would you be willing to spend more on temperature control, lighting, security, etc?

Posted by & filed under Advertisement, app, artificial inteligence, bots, Business Intelligence, market intelligence, messenger, networking, online business, user habits.

Description: Can a new wave of chatbots from Facebook and Microsoft upend apps as we know them, or is that just wishful thinking?

Source: Fast Company

Date: April 22, 2016

Internet Call

The rise of conversational “chatbots” begins with a claim you might initially dismiss as preposterous. “Bots are the new apps,” Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella declared during the company’s Build developers conference last month. “People-to-people conversations, people-to-digital assistants, people-to-bots, and even digital assistants-to-bots. That’s the world you’re going to get to see in the years to come.”

Nadella is not alone in seeing bots as a radical change in how we interact with computers. Beyond Microsoft—which is now offering bots within Skype to help you book hotels and flights, and a bot-building tool suite for developers—other major tech players are jumping in. Facebook is bringing a suite of chatbots to Messenger to help you order flowers or check the weather, taking a page from other messenger apps like WeChat and Kik. Slack allows third-party chatbots for work that can coordinate lunch or order supplies. Around these efforts, an entire industry has sprung forth, as smaller startups build their own bots and bot-related tools.

Certainly, Nadella’s assertion about the rise of chatbots contains a dose of hyperbole—a chatbot isn’t going to replace every application you might want on a computer—but that doesn’t mean bots don’t matter. Just as smartphone apps made us rethink how we interact with computers, bots could have a similarly transformative effect. And the ones who are betting on it now, like Nadella and Mark Zuckerberg, will have the last laugh.

Read More.

Questions for discussion:

1. Why talk to a bot when you can browse a website?

2. Can bots really replace apps?

Posted by & filed under Advertisement, Android, app, Apple, Banking, encryption, hackers, Privacy, Security, Social Media.

Description: Scammers have been worming their way into giant social media networks to trick people into giving over their personal and financial information

Source: CNN Money

Date: April 22, 2016

1. Fake customer service accounts on Twitter: Online criminals set up fake customer service accounts to phish for bank login and password information and other sensitive data.

2. Fake comments on popular posts: Fraudsters like to take advantage of that large audience by adding their own comments with links to other buzzy headlines that lead to credit card phishing scams.

3. Fake live-stream videos: Links that lead to a fake website that asks for personal information in order to start the video, which very often doesn’t exist.

4. Fake online discounts: Fake online discounts work similarly to fake customer service accounts. Schemers will set up social media accounts that look like legit businesses, then pretend to offer a real promotion.

5. Fake online surveys and contests: These tactics have been around for years and are designed to get answers to personal questions that fraudsters can mine and sell later. But criminals embed them into social media posts that often look legit because there’s a normal looking profile picture and link, thanks to URL shorteners.

Questions for discussion:

1. Have you ever been the victim of an online scam/fraud?
2. What are ways to prevent becoming a victim of online fraud?